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Excited Americans Watch Spectacular Total Solar Eclipse

  • Gibbs Dube

Some visitors and local people watching the total solar eclipse in Greenville, South Carolina.

Americans, who watched a total solar eclipse in Powdersville, Greenville, South Carolina, the event was a great occurrence as the moon passed between the earth and the sun.

A large number of people watch total solar eclipse at Central Park in Greenville, schools and their homes.

Retired school teacher, Dortha, and her sister said they were excited to watch the total solar eclipse at Central Park, where professional and amateur photographers and videographers also gathered to capture the solar eclipse.

Some of the people who watched the total solar eclipse at Central Park, Greenville, South Carolina on Monday.
Some of the people who watched the total solar eclipse at Central Park, Greenville, South Carolina on Monday.

A woman who only wanted to be identified as Dortha said, “This was a fantastic occurrence … When I thought about coming I said maybe that’s what it was like when Jesus died on the cross and it got dark … even if it did not take that long like what it looked like when Jesus died.”

The total solar eclipse lasted more than two minutes and 20 seconds, a situation that forced birds to return to their nests at the Central Park.

For amateur photographer, Allen Coons of Atlanta, this was a time for him to read a lot about the solar eclipse and then capture than moment on a still camera.

“This is one of the most amazing things I have ever done … Just the whole experience you can’t put words to just having the sun up there but still blocked I’ve never seen that. I have got an Nikon D760 … I’m using solar filter infront of the lens and I’ve been bracketing every exposure.

“So, just looked through and I’ve got solar flares … I’ve got everything you are looking for in an eclipse. I did a lot of internet research in the last couple of weeks and my wife was a bit kind to let me throw a little money at a different lens to shoot this and now I just made it work.”

Millions of people across the United States watched a rare total solar eclipse which darkened the skies from the Pacific to the Atlantic for the first time in 99 years.
Millions of people across the United States watched a rare total solar eclipse which darkened the skies from the Pacific to the Atlantic for the first time in 99 years.

Several other people, including John Canover of Virginia, said they went to Central Park early Monday morning in order to find a good place for watching the total solar eclipse.

“At one o’clock the moon started moving from the right … it was unnoticeable for a long time and the sun kept on being blacked out and blacked out and it was unnoticed from here … Eventually the thing that changed it that it got cooler maybe with the sun half way covered …

“It then became a little bit dark, darker and darker and then 90 percent covered and then became more dark and the crabs started coming more alive and the totality happened around 2:38 pm, I guess. That was pretty spectacular and that was the time to take the glasses off and look at it. It was worth the trip.”

His wife, Virginia, said this was the second time she had seen a total solar eclipse. “We saw a total solar eclipse in the 1970s but at that time we didn’t know that you could take your sunglasses off when the sun is totally covered and so I had never seen the corona. I was very excited to see that.”

Watching Central Park the total solar eclipse Greenville, South Carolina, USA.
Watching Central Park the total solar eclipse Greenville, South Carolina, USA.

The path, where the moon completely covered the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere – the corona, stretched from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina.

Observers outside this path like Washington DC and others saw a partial solar eclipse where the moon covered part of the sun.

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