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'Lost Tongue' Documentary Wins Award in New York

  • Jonga Kandemiiri

Davison Mudzingwa directing 'Lost Tongue'

Davison Mudzingwa directing 'Lost Tongue'

A documentary ‘Lost Tongue’ directed by Zimbabwean Davison Mudzingwa of Mvura Ya Afrika Production scooped the prestigious Women Film Critics Circle Award at the just-ended Socially Relevant Film Festival held in New York, United States.

Speaking from his base in Johannesburg, South Africa, Mudzingwa said he is happy to receive the award as his documentary stood out among the best eight out of 49 entries.

“Firstly we were surprised then we were humbled to realize that there are people out there who realize the importance of our work, and when the Women Film Critic Circle singled out our work as the one that they want to award at the Socially Relevant Film Festival we were really encouraged by this,” said Mudzingwa.

He said that it gives them confidence that their work resonates with the whole world.

"We are encouraged by this recognition. It gives us confidence that the body of work we did resonates with the whole world. However, more importantly the award gives the film traction.”

Mudzingwa further noted that their aim is that the whole world should take notice of the urgent intervention required in the Kalahari Desert but most importantly for everyone to reflect and save their identity.

He said the award was a tribute to the people of the Kalahari Desert, who allowed them to work with the local community.

“They showed that, despite the problems they face, there is still hope for humanity," he said.

Mudzingwa pointed out that the documentary is set to premiere at the Singapore World International Film Festival in April and at the ReelHeART International Film and Screenplay Festival that will be held in July in Toronto, Canada, where it will compete with films from around the world for the Best Feature Documentary title.

The documentary ‘Lost Tongue’ is about the dying N!uu language spoken by the Khomani San of the Kalahari Desert in South Africa, and how it can be saved from extinction with the number of surviving people who can speak the language diminishing.

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