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The Washington Nationals celebrate after Game 7 of the baseball World Series against the Houston Astros Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Houston. The Nationals won 6-2 to win the series. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

Almost out of contention in May, champs in October.

Howie Kendrick, Anthony Rendon and the Washington Nationals completed their amazing comeback journey — fittingly with one last late rally on the road.

In Game 7 of the World Series, no less.

Kendrick and Rendon homered in the seventh inning as the Nationals overcame a two-run deficit, rocking the Houston Astros 6-2 Wednesday night to win the first title in franchise history.

With all eyes on Max Scherzer and his remarkable recovery after a painkilling injection, these Nationals truly embraced their shot in the first Series when the road team won every game.

Even more against the odds: Juan Soto and Washington rallied from behind to win five elimination games this postseason, an unprecedented feat.

“What a story,” said Ryan Zimmerman, the Nationals’ first draft pick back in 2005. “I hope D.C.’s ready for us to come home!”

World Series MVP Stephen Strasburg, new lefty Patrick Corbin and the Nats brought the first World Series championship to the nation’s capital since ol’ Walter Johnson delivered the crown for the Senators in 1924.

This franchise started out as the Montreal Expos in 1969. They moved to D.C. in 2005, ending Washington’s three-decade-plus wait for big league baseball after the Senators left town to become the Texas Rangers.

But the incredible path these wild-card Nationals with the curly W logo took, well, no one could have imagined.

“Resilient, relentless bunch of guys,” manager Dave Martinez said. “They fought all year long.”

Having lost star slugger Bryce Harper to free agency and beset by bullpen woes, Washington plummeted to 19-31 in late May. It got so bad there was talk around town the Nationals might fire Martinez and trade away Scherzer.

Instead, they stuck with the mantra that sprung up on T-shirts — Stay In The Fight.

“That was our motto,” Scherzer said.

And months later they finished it, indeed.

In this photo provided by the White House via the Twitter account of President Donald Trump after it was declassified by Trump, a photo of the military working dog that was injured tracking down Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in Syria.

The "hero" dog wounded in the U.S. commando raid that culminated in the death of Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is getting a White House homecoming next week, President Donald Trump said Thursday.

Trump revealed that the military dog, a Belgian Malinois, is named "Conan" -- heretofore a closely guarded secret because the information could be used to identify the special forces unit that carried out the raid in Syria over the weekend.

Trump posted a photomontage on Twitter showing him bestowing a medal of honor on the dog with the legend: "AMERICAN HERO."

"Very cute recreation, but the 'live' version of Conan will be leaving the Middle East for the White House sometime next week!" he tweeted.

It was unclear what else lies in store for Conan, but it has been noted that Trump is the first U.S. president in more than a hundred years who doesn't own a dog.

Conan was injured chasing Baghdadi into a dead end tunnel in his Syrian hideout, where the cornered IS leader detonated a suicide vest, killing himself and two children, according to the U.S. account.

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Mark Milley, said earlier this week that the hero dog was expected to make a full recovery and was already back with his handlers.

The photomontage that Trump retweeted was produced by the conservative publication Daily Wire.

It used a White House picture of the president draping the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military medal, around the neck of James McCloughan, a former army medic distinguished for saving lives under fire during the Vietnam War.

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