Accessibility links

Lack of Opposition, Civil Society Voices in Zanu PF Feud Baffles Observers

  • Ndimyake Mwakalyelye

Emmerson Mnangagwa, right, is sworn in as vice president by Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe at State House in Harare, Friday, Dec, 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)

Emmerson Mnangagwa, right, is sworn in as vice president by Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe at State House in Harare, Friday, Dec, 12, 2014. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)

The tension within Zanu-PF ahead of its 2014 national congress, has been characterized by many as the worst the ruling party has experienced.

However, despite the uncertainty that ensured, due to the removal of elected mayors and parliamentarians, many noted the absence of the voices of opposition political parties and civil society.

Studio 7’s Ndimyake Mwakalyelye, sought perspectives from media and gender consultant Simbiso Marimbe of the Federation of African Media Women-Zimbabwe, and political analyst Nkululeko Sibanda of Huddersfield University in London.

Sibanda said, “The whole crisis in Zanu PF was a crisis of personalities and this problem obtains in both civil society and the country and in the opposition as well.”

The Zanu PF feud pitted factions allegedly led by recently appointed Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa and former Vice President Joice Mujuru, who was booted out of the party following allegations that she wanted to topple Mr. Mugabe using unconstitutional ways.

The former vice president has dismissed these allegations as misguided and designed to elliminate from the ruling party.

XS
SM
MD
LG