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Zimbabwe Judge: Spouses Can't Touch Each Other's Mobile Phones

  • Arthur Chigoriwo

A Zimbabwean judge says married people have a right to privacy.

A Zimbabwean judge says married people have a right to privacy.

Some Zimbabweans have commended a judge’s ruling that spouses should not pry on each other’s mobile phones with legal practitioners noting that the judge merely interpreted the law enshrined in the country’s constitution.

Passing judgment on a culpable homicide case involving 36 year-old Fortunate Nsoro on Tuesday, High Court judge Justice Tawanda Chitapi said it is illegal for spouses to pry into each other’s mobile phones as that infringes on the privacy of individuals.

Nsoro was convicted of killing her late husband 55 year-old, Petros Mutasa, for refusing to show her a message that had been sent on his mobile phone. She was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

Some Chinhoyi residents welcomed the judgement, which becomes a judicial precedent, meaning that some judges may refer to it when handling similar cases in the future.

Gwendolyn Chitemo welcomed the judgement saying that will minimize some misunderstandings among couples.

Tapiwa Chakwizira concurred, adding that the judgment gave individuals the right to privacy that was no longer observed among spouses.

But Crispen Neshambe said this judgement may cause problems as it defeats the purpose of marriage, which defines those who tied the knot as becoming one flesh after exchanging vows.

Human Rights lawyer, Dzikamai Machingura, said the learned judge interpreted the law correctly, as he upheld the right to privacy which is in the supreme law of the country.

Nsoro will serve eight years in prison after two years were suspended on condition that she does not commit a similar crime within the period.

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