Accessibility links

Footballers' Trust Launch Attracts Only 50 Zimbabweans

  • Michael Kariati

Motor Action are destined for lower dvision soccer next year after they were beaten Saturday by Black Rhinos (Courtesy Photo)

Motor Action are destined for lower dvision soccer next year after they were beaten Saturday by Black Rhinos (Courtesy Photo)

The much talked about launch of the Zimbabwe Footballers Trust turned out to be nothing but a damp squib.

What had been billed to be a day of celebration for the Zimbabwe’s Footballers Trust turned out to be nothing but an afternoon football kick-around as less than 50 people watched the game pitting Zimbabweans and South African soccer legends.

The same number attended the launch of the Zimbabwe Footballers Trust.

Even a football administrator, who turned out to watch the match, jokingly said if one was to take away football administrators and journalists from the stadium, then nobody except the players would have remained.

The South African players themselves might not have publicly shown it but they were even shocked by the number of people who turned out to watch their game.

Former Bafana Bafana World Cup goalkeeper Brian Baloyi even hinted they would love to host their Zimbabwean brothers and help them in one way or the other.

The secretary general of the Zimbabwe Footballers Trust, Eric Aisam, admitted they got it all wrong adding that they did not do enough to ensure the success of such a big game.

Despite the events that characterized the game, Aisam said he is happy that they fulfilled their goal of bringing the South African legends to Rufaro Stadium and that they played their game.

Aisam also took time to throw stones at the football controlling body, the Zimbabwe Football Association, saying they left the Zimbabwe Footballers Trust to do things on their own.

However, Zimbabwe Football Association Chief Executive Officer Jonathan Mashingaidze has hit back saying the former footballers wanted to do things on their own.

He said Zifa did not want to get involved in such a scenario.

Baloyi, who was part of the South Africa team at the 2002 World Cup finals in Korea and Japan said they were in Zimbabwe not only for the game but also to help the former footballers on how they can have a voice in the running of the Zimbabwean game.

Zimbabwe’s former footballers have been calling for their voice to be heard in the corridors of football power but nobody has cared to listen.

The Zimbabwean football legends are now preparing for their return match against the South Africans, most probably in early January.

Maybe, they will come back with better ideas on how best to organize an event.
XS
SM
MD
LG