Accessibility links

Frustrated Zimbabweans in Diaspora Turn to Social Media


Election campaign posters are pictured near Zimbabweans walking on a street blocked by uncollected garbage in Harare July 17, 2013.

Election campaign posters are pictured near Zimbabweans walking on a street blocked by uncollected garbage in Harare July 17, 2013.

Zimbabweans in the Diaspora, who are not allowed to vote, on Wednesday turned to social media networks like Facebook and Twitter to encourage relatives back home to go out and cast their ballots.

It’s estimated that there are over three million Zimbabweans in the diaspora and only a small number has been able to go back home and cast their votes.

Zanu PF member and fellow at Harvard University's Du Bois Institute for African Research, Garikayi Chengu, said he is confident his party will win the election judging from previous opinion polls.

"I am confident that my party the Zanu PF will be voted back into power. People are supporting President Robert Mugabe's Zanu PF party as their policies favour bringing wealth and land back to the people," said Chengu.

MDC-T youth chairman for Washington, Admonish Deda, was impressed with the high voter turnout by youth at polling stations.

Deda said the huge turn out by the youth works in favour of the MDC-T as this age- group has largely been ignored in past elections but may hold the key to winning the polls.

"Most Zimbabweans will return back home should the MDC-T win this election as many are interested in rebuilding the nation that has been crippled by economic decline and a high unemployment rate," said Deda.

"The new government that will come into power should prioritize job creation to ensure that the youths and others in the Diaspora are attracted back to rebuild the country," said Deda.

He said despite various irregularities at polling stations he hopes that this will not deter his party from winning the election.
XS
SM
MD
LG