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MDC-T Seeking SADC Help to Tackle Zimbabwe Election Crisis

  • Gibbs Dube

President Robert Mugabe and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai at the constitution signing ceremony

President Robert Mugabe and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai at the constitution signing ceremony

The Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) formation of Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai says it will soon approach the Southern African Development Community (SADC) to seek its intervention on the country’s electoral crisis.

Party spokesman Douglas Mwonzora tells VOA Studio 7 the party wants SADC to give the unity government partners direction on holding crucial elections following a ruling on Friday by the Supreme Court that the country should hold polls no later than July 31this year.

Mr. Mwonzora says the party’s national standing committee held a meeting Saturday and resolved that they will abide by the Supreme Court ruling though the date of the elections still remains the center of dispute in the unity government.

A man identified as Jealousy Mawarire approached the Supreme Court recently and filed an application seeking to compel President Robert Mugabe to declare the election date.

He argued that Zimbabwe will be run by an illegitimate government when parliament’s term comes to an end June 29.

In a related development, the MDC-T party is believed to be facing problems in some parts of the country where is it conducting primary elections.

One of the losing candidates, Jimmy Jombo Charowa of Mudzi North in Mashonaland East Province, declared in a WhatApp group chat forum that he will be standing as an independent candidate in the forthcoming polls.

Mr. Mwonzora, who says the primaries are going on smoothly nationwide, has no kind words for such party members.

In the other MDC formation led by Industry Minister Welshman Ncube, indications are that some people are also not happy about the way the primaries are being conducted.

Party spokesman Nhlanhla Dube says his party is doing what he calls a consultation process for choosing candidates instead of common primary polls.