Accessibility links

Wrangling Continues Zimbabwe's Global Political Agreement Turns Two

  • Jonga Kandemiiri

The past two years have been marked by one dispute after another between the Movement for Democratic Change formation headed by Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, opposition leader at the time of the GPA's signature, and the ZANU-PF party of President Robert Mugabe

Two years after the signature of the Global Political Agreement under which Zimbabwe's warring political parties agreed to share power in a government of national unity, the governing partners continue to wrangle over a multitude of issues relating to the accord's implementation.

Many observers said the power sharing arrangement has been far less productive than it might have been in terms of the democratic transition it was supposed to usher in, and consequently the country has made far less progress toward reconstruction than it might have.

The past two years have been marked by one dispute after another between the Movement for Democratic Change formation headed by Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, opposition leader at the time of the GPA's signature, and the ZANU-PF party of President Robert Mugabe.

Wednesday also saw the expiration of a deadline set for the Harare unity government by South African President Jacob Zuma, Zimbabwe mediator for the Southern African Development Community, to implement resolutions on issues outstanding for many months.

Such issues include the swearing-in of MDC provincial governors.

Tsvangirai MDC spokesman Nelson Chamisa told VOA Studio 7 reporter Sandra Nyaira said that the MDC will report to Mr. Zuma that ZANU-PF has not adhered to the deadline.

But ZANU-PF spokesman Rugare Gumbo said things are better than the MDC portrays them and the MDC should not constantly look to Mr. Zuma and SADC to resolve zimbabwe’s problems.

Harare-based political analyst Charles Mangongera said that while the country has seen positive changes in the past two years, progress on the political reform front has been limited.

Meanwhile, a senior British official said Tuesday that it is vital that monitors and observers be in place before a referendum is held on the revised constitution now being prepared, and the next general elections, so that the chaos and violence of the 2008 elections are not repeated.

Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs Henry Bellingham told the UK House of Commons London is doing all it can to encourage peace, stability and democracy in Zimbabwe.

National Constitutional Assembly Chairman Lovemore Madhuku told reporter Jonga Kandemiiri that Harare should take London's position seriously and not revive old bilateral controversies.

XS
SM
MD
LG