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Are Zimbabweans in Diaspora Doing Enough to Enhance Democracy Back Home?

  • Gibbs Dube

FILE - Zimbabweans fill out application forms outside Immigration offices in Johannesburg.

FILE - Zimbabweans fill out application forms outside Immigration offices in Johannesburg.

Some Zimbabweans living in the diaspora have commended the United States for attempting to normalize the social, political and economic situation in the country over the years.

They say the current visit in the nation by Deputy assistant secretary for African Affairs, Dr. Shannon Smith, and Steven Feldstein, assistant secretary in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, is an indication that America is committed in ensuring that the country embraces democracy.

But some critics say most Zimbabweans living in the diaspora are leaving everything in the hands of America and other nations, a development they believe will ensure continued rule by President Robert Mugabe’s Zanu PF party.

They argue that though Zimbabweans are contributing almost one billion dollars in remittances to the country’s economy, this is not enough to create a democratic nation.

For perspective, Studio 7’s Gibbs Dube speaks with Dr. Bruce Mutsvairo, Senior Lecturer in Media and Politics at Northumbria University, Newcastle in Britain, and Nomsa Nekevane, another Zimbabwean living in that country.

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