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Zimbabweans Failing to Get Cash 'Camp' Outside Banks


In this Friday, July 2, 2010 picture an unidentified man shows dirty one dollar notes before washing them in Harare, Zimbabwe. The washing machine cycle takes about 45 minutes _ and George Washington comes out much cleaner than before in Zimbabwe-style la

In this Friday, July 2, 2010 picture an unidentified man shows dirty one dollar notes before washing them in Harare, Zimbabwe. The washing machine cycle takes about 45 minutes _ and George Washington comes out much cleaner than before in Zimbabwe-style la

Some local people are camping outside banks in Masvingo in an attempt to withdraw their hard-earned United States dollars in fear that they may lost their money like what happened when the Zimbabwe dollar was dumped in 2009 when the country adopted multiple currencies.

Edmore Makonese is one of the villagers, who has spent more than three days attempting without success, to withdraw his money from a local bank.

Makonese says he will only go back home when he gets the money.

“I have been here since Saturday to get my money but it is now Tuesday to get whatever little amount is there. The main reason is because of the recent bond notes fiasco announced by the RBZ governor. I lost my savings in 2008 and I will stay in town and in the pavement until I get my money.”

Another Masvingo resident, Sheila Mutuwa, who has braved the harsh weather conditions and decided to camp at a local bank, says all she needs is her money.

“I have come all the way from Zaka and sleeping in the pavements and with the coming of the bond notes I am afraid the Zim dollar is back and I will rather get what is in my account before it’s too late.”

Terrence Gono concurs, adding that it is difficult to understand the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe’s move to introduce the bond notes.

“They are trying to explain to us on how the bond notes will work but the language is too technical for us and we have no option but to secure what is in our accounts.”

Elton Chauke, another villager from Mwenezi communal lands, says they have lost confidence in anything that is being done by the government and as a result they cannot fall accept what he calls worthless bond notes.

“I don’t trust this government I just think I should take my US dollars into my pocket because I don’t want to come here one day and I will be told that we now have Zim dollars just like what happened in the past when we woke to be told that the country no longer have money.

RBZ governor John Mangudya says the bond notes are designed to promote exports while easing cash shortages in a declining economy.

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