Accessibility links

South Africans, Zimbabweans Mourn Late Soul Brothers' David Masondo

  • Benedict Nhlapho

Moses Ngwenya, the only surviving founding member of the group, says Masondo will be greatly missed but the Soul Brothers will not die.

Moses Ngwenya, the only surviving founding member of the group, says Masondo will be greatly missed but the Soul Brothers will not die.

Condolences have poured from all over the world following the death of South African Mbaqanga legend David Masondo. Masondo, who co-founded the Soul Brothers in 1974, died at the Garden City Hospital in Johannesburg on Sunday.

Many people have described him as a music hero who shall be forever missed.

The death of David Masondo has left many shocked and in tears. Masondo, who was the lead singer of the Soul Brothers, died after he was hospitalized when he felt extremely tired following a sterling performance.

Many have described his death as a shocking loss.

Moses Ngwenya, the only surviving founding member of the group, says Masondo will be greatly missed but the Soul Brothers will not die.

“It’s very bad because we have been together with this guy for about 40 years. We liked what we were doing and playing music. We really definitely think we will continue with the name because that’s a big brand,” says Masondo.

Soul Brothers Manager, Bhodloza Nzimande, described him as the best of South Africa’s music talents.

“He is a hero in as far as music is concerned especially the music of this country, local music especially traditionally and mbaqanga music.”

South Africa’s well-known poet Mzwakhe Mbuli says he should be counted among music kings.

“We have lost a mbaqanga king, the leader of Soul Brothers known all over the world, internationally acclaimed. Like a soldier he fell on the battle-field.”

Under Masondo’s leadership the Soul Brothers had soul touching songs like Wambiza umbiza and others that could send the body into motion like Idlozi.

Zimbabwean gospel musician Marvelous Sibanda says mbaqanga will never be the same without Masondo.

“Very good guy, my father even a teacher to me,” says Sibanda.

Zimbabwean mbaqanga lovers like Nkosini Tshuma have saluted him for the influence he had on Zimbabwean musicians.

“The Soul Brothers inspired a lot of musicians in Zimbabwe especially those who were willing.”

While people from all walks of life will have songs to remember dished by Masondo and the Soul Brother’s thirty albums, there is no doubt that the blonde and beautiful will forever salute him for the songs like Wamuhle Mtwanomuntu.

XS
SM
MD
LG