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South Africans Vote in Nationwide Elections

  • VOA Staff

African National Congress (ANC) election posters featuring images of South Africa's President Jacob Zuma are displayed on a wall as a school boy climbs over it in Embo, May 6, 2014.

African National Congress (ANC) election posters featuring images of South Africa's President Jacob Zuma are displayed on a wall as a school boy climbs over it in Embo, May 6, 2014.

Millions of South Africans are voting in nationwide elections Wednesday.

For the first time, the electorate includes a so-called "born free" generation, with birthdays after apartheid rule in South Africa ended in April 1994.

Some eligible voters say they are disappointed that the ruling African National Congress has failed to extend basic services like clean water and electricity to all South Africans. Others are disgusted by the wave of corruption allegations that has washed over the ANC's leader, President Jacob Zuma.

Nonetheless, polls say the ANC is still expected to win more than 60 percent of the popular vote, which would keep Zuma in office for a second five-year term.

Results are expected May 10.

The opposition Democratic Alliance expects a strong turnout in urban areas but still struggles to appeal to mainstream black voters.

Rule by the white minority in South Africa ended on April 27, 1994, when the ANC won the first multi-racial elections. Then-ANC leader Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as president the following month.


A look at South Africa:

Capital: Pretoria is the administrative capital, Cape Town is the legislative capital and Bloemfontein is the judicial capital.

Most Populated City: Johannesburg

Official Languages: English, Afrikaans, Ndebele, Northern Sotho, Sotho, Swazi, Tswana, Tsonga, Venda, Xhosa and Zulu

Population: 53 million

Political History:

1948-National Party institutionalized apartheid.
1990-Nelson Mandela released after 27 years in prison.
1994-Apartheid ends after first democratic election.
2013-Nelson Mandela dies at age 95.


Nonetheless, polls say the ANC is still expected to win more than 60 percent of the popular vote, which would keep Zuma in office for a second five-year term.

Results are expected May 10.

The opposition Democratic Alliance expects a strong turnout in urban areas but still struggles to appeal to mainstream black voters.

Rule by the white minority in South Africa ended on April 27, 1994, when the ANC won the first multi-racial elections. Then-ANC leader Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as president the following month.
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