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Top MDC-T, Zanu PF Officials Trade Barbs Over Mugabe Succession

  • Gibbs Dube

FILE Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe addresses supporters at the party headquarters in Harare, Wednesday Feb, 10, 2016.

FILE Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe addresses supporters at the party headquarters in Harare, Wednesday Feb, 10, 2016.

Zanu PF says it has banned its members from using social and conventional media for denigrating party supporters, a clear move viewed as an attempt to stop factionalism that is currently ravaging the party.

Professor Jonathan Moyo has been using his personal Twitter account to provoke discussions on various issues, including suspected moves by Vice President Emmerson Mnangagwa to take over ageing President Robert Mugabe’s post if he leaves office.

On the other hand, Mnangagwa is believed to have been using some politicians, like War Veterans Minister Christopher Mutsvangwa, to hit back on Moyo’s accusations through using the state-controlled media. Now, the Zanu PF Politburo, which held a crucial meeting yesterday, has ruled that all this must stop.

According to the state-controlled Herald newspaper, the party further noted that factionalism has no space in the ruling party, whose center of power is President Mugabe. Zanu PF members have welcomed this move while critics say the president has become a major stumbling block in addressing most issues affecting the country.

For perspective, Studio 7 reached Joseph Tshuma, a Zanu PF lawmaker and Central Committee member, and Abenico Bhebhe, an MDC-T lawmaker.

Tshuma said outside forces and not Mr. Mugabe are causing havoc in Zimbabwe.

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