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Court Reserves Judgement in Expelled MDC-T Senator Case

  • Taurai Shava

FILE: MDC supporters attending a recent rally in Harare. (Photo: MDC Facebook Page)

FILE: MDC supporters attending a recent rally in Harare. (Photo: MDC Facebook Page)

A High Court judge in Bulawayo on Friday reserved judgment in a matter in which Matson Hlalo, an expelled member of Morgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change, is challenging his expulsion from the party and the Senate.

High Court judge Justice Nokhuthula Moyo said she would make a ruling at a later date in the case in which Hlalo filed an urgent chamber application, seeking to have the court set aside his recent recall from the senate as well as his dismissal from the party.

Hlalo is also seeking an interim order to stop the MDC-T from appointing another person as senator until the matter is finalised.

Asked how confident he is in having the courts rule in his favour in a matter that is between him and his political party, Hlalo, who is being represented by attorney Godfrey Nyoni, said he had been compelled to approach the courts as a last resort, because he felt the MDC-T had failed to follow the dictates of justice, one of the principles that the party espouses.

He said his dismissal from both the party and the senate was not procedural as the MDC-T’s constitution had not been properly followed.

But MDC-T secretary general Douglas Mwonzora, who is representing the party, said the party has clearly laid down procedures that are meant to address members’ grievances.

He the MDC-T decided to expel him as he had chosen not to follow laid down regulations, adding that Hlalo’s case has no merit as the party followed some provisions of its constitution to recall and expel him.

Hlalo’s clash with the MDC-T emanates from his refusal to accept the election of Gift Banda as the party’s chairperson for Bulawayo province. Hlalo argued that the internal vote in which Banda was elected in 2014 was marred by violence. His fight over Banda’s election is still in the courts.