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No Progress in Civil Servants' Salary Negotiations

  • Chris Gande

A man counts US dollars and Burma kyats at a money changer in Rangoon, March 21, 2012.

A man counts US dollars and Burma kyats at a money changer in Rangoon, March 21, 2012.

Civil servants, who were looking forward to a hefty salary increase before the end of the year after President Robert Mugabe’s assurance of a pay raise, will have to wait a bit longer because of disagreements on the composition of the National Joint Negotiating Council.

According to The Herald newspaper, civil service unions are reported to have submitted 12 names of representatives instead of nine as stipulated by a government statutory instrument.

Secretary for Public Service, Labor and Social Welfare, Ngoni Masoka is quoted by the state-run newspaper as saying the delay in coming up with a proper list is delaying the salary negotiations.

A letter written to the unions reads in part, “At the moment, no list of the workers’ negotiators has been submitted and this is jeopardizing social dialogue between government and its employees. Accordingly, this letter serves as a follow up on how far you have gone in coming up with a properly constituted apex council."

The civil servants are asking for $600 a month for the lowest paid worker.

However, Secretary General, Richard Gundane of the Zimbabwe Teachers’ Association downplayed the impasse over the list of negotiators, adding that is not an issue at all.
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